PeggyB

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About PeggyB

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  • Birthday 11/17/1947

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  1. 7/26/16

    1940 Billboard magazine published its first singles record chart (for the week of July 20). 1953 An armistice was signed ending the Korean War. 1974 The House Judiciary Committee voted to impeach Richard Nixon for obstructing justice in the Watergate case. 1995 The Korean War Veterans Memorial was dedicated in Washington, DC. 1996 A pipe bomb exploded in an Atlanta park during the Olympic Games. 2003 Lance Armstrong won his fifth straight Tour de France, tying Miguel Indurain's record. 2012 The 2012 Summer Olympics began in London. **********************************************************************************************************DAILY EXTRA*************************************************** 1861....................Union general George B. McClellan was put in command of the Army of the Potomac during the Civil War. The Army of the Potomac was created in 1861, but was then only the size of a corps (relative to the size of Union armies later in the war). Its nucleus was called the Army of Northeastern Virginia, under Brig. Gen. Irvin McDowell, and it was the army that fought (and lost) the war's first major battle, the First Battle of Bull Run. The arrival in Washington, D.C., of Maj. Gen. George B. McClellan dramatically changed the makeup of that army. McClellan's original assignment was to command the Division of the Potomac, which included the Department of Northeast Virginia under McDowell and the Department of Washington under Brig. Gen. Joseph K. Mansfield. On July 26, 1861, the Department of the Shenandoah, commanded by Maj. Gen. Nathaniel P. Banks, was merged with McClellan's departments and on that day, McClellan formed the Army of the Potomac, which was composed of all military forces in the former Departments of Northeastern Virginia, Washington, Pennsylvania, and the Shenandoah. The men under Banks's command became an infantry division in the Army of the Potomac.[1] The army started with four corps, but these were divided during the Peninsula Campaign to produce two more. After the Second Battle of Bull Run, the Army of the Potomac absorbed the units that had served under Maj. Gen. John Pope. It is a popular, but mistaken, belief that John Pope commanded the Army of the Potomac in the summer of 1862 after McClellan's unsuccessful Peninsula Campaign. On the contrary, Pope's army consisted of different units and was named the Army of Virginia. During the time that the Army of Virginia existed, the Army of the Potomac was headquartered on the Virginia Peninsula, and then outside Washington, D.C., with McClellan still in command, although three corps of the Army of the Potomac were sent to northern Virginia and were under Pope's operational control during the Northern Virginia Campaign. The Army of the Potomac -- Our Outlying Picket in the Woods, 1862 The Army of the Potomac underwent many structural changes during its existence. The army was divided by Ambrose Burnside into three grand divisions of two corps each with a Reserve composed of two more. Hooker abolished the grand divisions. Thereafter the individual corps, seven of which remained in Virginia, reported directly to army headquarters. (Joseph Hooker also created a Cavalry Corps by combining units that previously had served as smaller formations.) In late 1863, two corps were sent West, and—in 1864—the remaining five corps were recombined into three. Burnside's IX Corps, which accompanied the army at the start of Ulysses S. Grant's Overland Campaign, was added later. For more detail, see the section Corps below. The Army of the Potomac fought in most of the Eastern Theater campaigns, primarily in (Eastern) Virginia, Maryland, and Pennsylvania. After the end of the war, it was disbanded on June 28, 1865, shortly following its participation in the Grand Review of the Armies. The Army of the Potomac was also the name given to General P. G. T. Beauregard's Confederate army during the early stages of the war (namely, First Bull Run; thus, the losing Union Army ended up adopting the name of the winning Confederate army). However, the name was eventually changed to the Army of Northern Virginia, which became famous under General Robert E. Lee. In 1869 the Society of the Army of the Potomac was formed as a veterans association. It had its last reunion in 1929.
  2. 7/26/16

    Nationality..................................Irish Born on.....................................26 July 1856 AD Sun Sign....................................Leo Born in.......................................Dublin Died on......................................02 November 1950 AD place of death............................Ayot St Lawrence father.........................................George Carr Shaw mother.......................................Lucinda Elizabeth Shaw siblings......................................Elinor Agnes Shaw, Lucinda Frances Shaw Spouse:....................................Charlotte Payne-Townshend education.................................Wesley College Founder/Co-Founder................London School of Economics and Political Science awards: 1925 - Nobel Prize in Literature 1939 - Academy Award for Best Writing Adapted Screenplay - Pygmalion 1952 - New York Drama Critics' Circle Special Citation - Don Juan in Hell George Bernard Shaw was an Irish playwright, literary critic and a fervent socialist who won the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1925. Born into a lower-middle class family in Dublin to an alcoholic father, George Bernard Shaw had a an irregular education and started working at the age of 15. After serving as a junior clerk for a while, Shaw moved to London to live with his mother and began writing plays and novels.to pursue a career in literature. Later, he established himself as an art and theatre critic, and also became a prominent member of the Fabian Society, a highly dominant British socialist organization. Most of his early plays focused on existing social problems and were not well-received by the audience but from 1895 onwards, Shaw’s work started gaining public recognition due to its comic relief. Some of his plays during this period such as ‘Caesar and Cleopatra’, ‘Major Barbara’, ‘The Doctor's Dilemma’, ‘Saint Joan’ and ‘Pygmalion’ received much appreciation and proved to be some of his greatest successes on the stage. Being an outright socialist, Shaw openly expressed his disapproval regarding the First World War, facing criticism for his opinions but after the war, he returned as a dramatist and was honored with the Nobel Prize in Literature for his outstanding contribution. He lived the rest of his life as an international celebrity, continually involved in dramatics until his death. Shaw still remains one of the most significant playwrights in the English language who helped shape the theatre of his time. In 1898, George Bernard Shaw married Charlotte Payne-Townshend, an Anglo-Irish heiress and a feminist who joined the Fabian Society. The marriage was a happy one although the couple had no children together. Shaw died on November 2, 1950, at his home in Ayot St. Lawrence in Hertfordshire, England, due to renal injuries which he incurred upon falling off a ladder while trimming a tree. He was cremated at the Golders Green Crematorium.
  3. 7/25/16

    1788 New York became the 11th state in the United States. 1847 Liberia became Africa's first republic. 1908 The Office of the Chief Examiner, which in 1935 became the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), was created. 1952 King Farouk I of Egypt abdicated after a coup led by Gamal Abdal Nasser. 1953 Fidel Castro was among a group of rebelling anti-Batistas who unsuccessfully attacked an army barracks. ************************************************************************************************DAILY EXTRA************************************************************* 1947..................President Harry S Truman signed the National Security Act, creating the Department of Defense, the National Security Council, the Central Intelligence Agency, and the Joint Chiefs of Staff. Both entities were established by the the National Security Act of 1947, signed on July 26, 1947, by President Harry S. Truman. The act, which took effect on September 18 of that year, also created the National Security Council and the United States Air Force. The Departments of War and Navy were combined to form the National Military Establishment; this became the Department of Defense when the act was amended in 1949. The Central Intelligence Agency is an independent executive bureau of the U.S. government, and replaced the wartime Office of Strategic Services (1942-45). In related areas, we have a directory of current executive departments and independent government agencies, as well as a list of all the U.S. presidents and their cabinet members in our almanac. Defense, United States Department of, executive department of the federal government charged with coordinating and supervising all agencies and functions of the government relating directly to national security and military affairs. Based in the Pentagon, it is divided into three major subsections—the U.S. Army, the U.S. Navy, and the U.S. Air Force. Among the many Defense Dept. agencies are the Missile Defense Agency (see Strategic Defense Initiative), the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, the Defense Intelligence Agency, the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency, and the National Security Agency. The department also operates several joint service schools, including the National War College National Security Council (NSC), federal executive council responsible for planning, coordinating, and evaluating the defense policies of the United States and also exercising direction over the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA). Created in 1947 by the National Security Act (amended in 1949), the council's formal members are the president, the vice president, the secretary of state, and the secretary of defense. The director of national intelligence (formerly, the director of the CIA), the head of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, the president's national security adviser (the assistant to the president for national security affairs, who is also the director of the NSC), and the deputy adviser usually attend as invited guests. Although President Eisenhower used the NSC as the centerpiece of his security policy apparatus, other presidents have relied more heavily on ad hoc organizations and special assistants. Prominent NSC directors have included Henry Kissinger and Zbigniew Brzezinski. The council also has a civilian staff that is headed by an executive secretary appointed by the president. Central Intelligence Agency (CIA), independent executive bureau of the U.S. government established by the National Security Act of 1947, replacing the wartime Office of Strategic Services (1942–45), the first U.S. espionage and covert operations agency. While the CIA's covert operations receive the most attention, its major responsibility is to gather intelligence, in which it uses not only covert agents but such technological resources as satellite photos and intercepted telecommunications transmissions. The CIA was given (1949) special powers under the Central Intelligence Act: The CIA director may spend agency funds without accounting for them; the size of its staff is secret; and employees, exempt from civil service procedures, may be hired, investigated, or dismissed as the CIA sees fit. Under the U.S. intelligence agency reorganization enacted in 2004, the CIA reports to the independent director of national intelligence, who is responsible for coordinating the work and budgets of all 15 U.S. intelligence agencies. To safeguard civil liberties in the United States, the CIA is denied domestic police powers; for operations in the United States it must enlist the services of the Federal Bureau of Investigation. Allen Welsh Dulles, director from 1953 to 1961, strengthened the agency and emboldened its tactics. The CIA has often been criticized for covert operations in the domestic politics of foreign countries. The agency was heavily involved in the failed 1961 Bay of Pigs invasion of Cuba, deeply embarrassing the United States. In 1971 the U.S. government acknowledged that the CIA had recruited and paid an army fighting in Laos. In 1973 the CIA came under congressional investigation for its role in the Pentagon Papers case. The agency had provided members of the White House staff, on request, with a personality profile of Daniel Ellsberg, defendant in the Pentagon Papers trial in 1973, and had indirectly aided the White House "Plumbers," the special unit established to investigate internal security leaks. This direct violation of the National Security Act's prohibition led Congress to strengthen provisions barring the agency from domestic operations. Its foreign operations came under attack in 1974 for involvement in Chilean internal affairs during the administration of Salvador Allende, and in 1986 it was shown to be involved in the Iran-Contra affair. Diminished in the early 1990s after the end of the cold war, it began rebuilding later in the decade, accelerating the process after the terror attacks of Sept. 11, 2001. It was subsequently hurt, however, by the revelation that Director George Tenet had insisted, prior to the Iraq invasion of 2003, that Iraq possessed weapons of mass destruction, and the quality of the intelligence that it had provided was criticized. One result of the intelligence failures relating to Sept., 2001, and Iraq was the reorganization of 2004, which demoted the director of the CIA and made the CIA one of several agencies overseen by the new position of director of national intelligence. Joint Chiefs of Staff, U.S. statutory agency, created in 1949 within the Dept. of Defense. The chairman is the principal military adviser to the President, the National Security Council, and the Secretary of Defense. Members include the chairman, appointed by the President with Senate approval; the chief of staff, U.S. army; the chief of naval operations; the chief of staff, U.S. air force; the commandant of the U.S. Marine Corps, and a vice chairman who manages the Joint Staff. The Joint Chiefs prepare military plans and direct unified and other combat commands under the Secretary of Defense.
  4. 7/25/16

    Nationality.....................................American Born on........................................25 July 1935 AD Sun Sign ......................................Leo Born in.........................................Evanston father...........................................Oscar Harris mother..........................................Natalie Spouse:........................................Paul Sills awards:........................................1966 - Tony Award for Best Actress in a Musical Barbara Harris is an American actress best known for her roles in films like ‘A Thousand Clowns’, and ‘Peggy Sue Got Married’. A Tony award winner, the lady was an accomplished stage actress long before she ventured into the world of cinema. Barbara knew from a young age that she wanted to be an actress. She plunged head on into acting, when she was a teenager and became associated with the stage. Pretty with thick blonde hair which she wore in a signature style, she was blessed with a natural flair for acting. She was very passionate about her chosen field and put her soul into each one of her performances. Such was her love for acting that she never chased the fame or wealth it brings—she was happy to act as long as she was offered the roles she liked and eventually chose to become an acting teacher, away from all the glamour and glitz of Hollywood. She had all the qualities to become a sexy superstar—beauty, brains, talent, and a huge fan following—yet she always remained the pretty and sweet girl-next-door throughout her acting career. She enjoyed her Broadway career a lot and is a recipient of the prestigious Tony Award.
  5. My visit to a Blueberry farm

    Nice pictures, Blueberries one of my favorites. Back in my younger days I used to work in Wyman's of Maine blueberry factory.
  6. 7/24/16

    1952 Puerto Rico became a commonwealth of the United States. 1956 The Italian liner Andrea Doria sank after colliding with the Swedish ship Stockholm off the New England coast, killing 51 people. 1978 The world's first test-tube baby, Louise Joy Brown, was born in Lancashire, England. 1984 Soviet cosmonaut Svetlana Savitskaya became the first woman to walk in space. 2000 The supersonic airliner Concorde crashed after takeoff outside Paris. ***************************************************************************************************DAILY EXTRA********************************************************** 1946........................................The United States tested the first underwater atomic bomb at Bikini Atoll. Bikini (bēkēˈnē) [key], atoll, c.2 sq mi (5.2 sq km), W central Pacific, one of the Ralik Chain, Marshall Islands. It comprises 36 islets on a reef 25 mi (40 km) long. After its inhabitants were removed (1946) to Rongerik, Bikini was the scene of 23 U.S. atomic and hydrogen bomb tests (1946–58). The natives were transferred from Rongerik to Ujelang in 1947 and in 1949 were resettled on Kili. Bikini was declared safe for habitation in 1969. In 1974, 100 natives returned, but they were evacuated in 1978 when new data showed high levels of residual radioactivity. A cleanup began in 1988. By the late 1990s, Bikini had become a popular destination for scuba divers, though it remained uninhabited pending completion of the cleanup. Bikini was formerly called Escholtz Island.
  7. 7/24/16

    Nationality.............................Swiss Born on.................................24 July 1880 Sun Sign...............................Leo Born in.................................Geneva Died on................................01 January 1970 place of death......................Portland Spouse:...............................Marguerite Schneider children................................Ivan, Suzanne, Lucienne education Conservatory in Brussels Hoch Conservatory in Frankfurt Ernest Bloch was a Swiss-American composer considered to be one of the most popular personalities of that time. Apart from composing he also worked as a professor in his later years. His works were acknowledged to be innovative and inventive. He is widely recognized as a successful composer whose works were appreciated and enjoyed all over by people of all ages. Bloch is also considered by many of his admirers to be the fourth ‘B’ of the Bach, Beethoven and Brahms quartet. An active wanderer and an explorer, he possessed the supreme qualities of a great composer, using romantic idioms in most of his works and writing in varied styles throughout his life. He did not care about fashion or traditions of his time. Instead, his interests were inclined towards the expression of his individuality, ideas, philosophy, truthfulness, intellect and ethnicity. His compositions had the balance of all the expressions and music was the most authentic language of his life. He was very much influenced by folk music and adopted the 12-tone technique and coloristic quartertones in his compositions, which was greatly appreciated by his listeners. In 1904, Bloch married Marguerite Schneider and they raised three children—Ivan, Suzanne and Lucienne. Ivan, who was born in 1905, became an engineer with the Bonneville Power Administration in Portland. The second born, Suzanne, followed in her father’s footsteps. She became a musician with interests in Renaissance music and taught lute and cembalo at the Julliard School in New York. Lucienne was born in 1909 and worked as a chief photographer at the Rockefeller Center Mural project. Ernest Bloch died of cancer, for which he was suffering for a long time, at Agate Beach, Oregon, on July 15, 1959, at the age of 78. Though Bloch had a significant interest in photography and developed a sizeable collection of his photographic works, he is best remembered for his music. His opera Macbeth (1910), which he performed in Paris was largely unappreciated by the audience but his subsequent works would gain him both name and fame. Most of his well known works were heavily influenced by Jewish liturgical and folk music. His composition, Schelomo (1916), for cello and orchestra, was dedicated to the cellist Aleixandre Barjansky.
  8. POTW Poland

    Post 6 all of them.
  9. 7/23/16

    1847 Brigham Young and the first members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints (Mormons) arrived at the Great Salt Lake. 1862 Martin Van Buren, the eighth president of the United States, died in Kinderhook, N.Y. 1866 Tennessee became the first Confederate state to be readmitted to the Union. 1937 Charges against five black men accused of raping two white women in the Scottsboro case were dropped. 1974 The U.S. Supreme Court unanimously ruled that President Richard Nixon had to turn over White House tapes to the Watergate special prosecutor. *******************************************************************************************************DAILY EXTRA****************************************************** 2002........................Nine coal miners were trapped in a mine in Pennsylvania. All were rescued three days later. Pennsylvania Coal Miners emerged in good health and spirits after enduring 77 grueling hours in a dark, flooded mine shaft 240 feet below ground in Quecreek. The nine workers—Randy Fogle, Dennis Hall, John Phillippi, Tom Foy, John Unger, Robert Pugh, Harry Mayhugh, Ron Hileman, and Mark Popernack—huddled together as millions of gallons of cold water from an adjacent mine rushed into their site, submerging them up to their necks.
  10. 7/23/16

    Nationality............................American Born on...............................23 July 1973 AD Sun Sign.............................Cancer Born in................................San Francisco, California, U.S. father..................................Bernard Lewinsky mother................................Marcia Kaye Vilensky Married...............................No education Sinai Akiba Academy John Thomas Dye School Beverly Hills High School Bel Air Prep Patrick Stewart Santa Monica College Lewis & Clark College Founder/Co-Founder..........The Real Monica, Inc. Monica Lewinsky, a young White House intern, made headlines for her affair with the then President, Bill Clinton. One of the most controversial high-profile political sex scandals in the history of America, ‘The Lewinsky Scandal’, created shock waves across the country. After a series of public denials of the affair, Clinton finally admitted to have had ‘an illicit physical relationship’ with Lewinsky. He was later charged with ‘perjury’ and was impeached. He was, however, acquitted following a 21-day trial. Lewinsky received immense media glare and publicity after the scandal - she appeared on many TV shows, commercials, and interviews and even made an appearance on a comic sketch, on ‘Saturday Night Live’. She also came out with her own line of handbags called the ‘The Real Monica, Inc.’. The label sold in many countries across the world. After a certain period of time, she could not handle the media frenzy and found it immensely difficult to lead a private life in America. Hence, she moved to London, where she obtained a degree in psychology from the London School of Economics. Trivia This infamous White House intern and fashion designer apparently stated that she survived the intense media attention she received following a sex scandal by ‘knitting’. This infamous White House intern, who gained immense publicity after a sex scandal, was, once, asked to sign an autograph that said ‘I'm kind of known for something that's not so great to be known for’.