PeggyB

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About PeggyB

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  • Birthday 11/17/1947

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  1. 5/31/16

    1792 Kentucky became the 15th state in the United States. 1796 Tennessee became the 16th state in the United States. 1938 The first issue of Action Comics, featuring Superman, was published. 1958 General Charles De Gaulle became the premier of France. 1968 Helen Keller, blind and deaf author-lecturer, died. 1980 Cable News Network (CNN) debuted. ***************************************************************************************************DAILY EXTRA************************************************************ 2001............................Crown Prince Dipendra of Nepal wiped out most of the royal family before shooting himself. crown prince of Nepal, went on a shooting rampage at the family's Kathmandu palace in June, wiping out nearly the entire royal family before turning his revolver on himself. Casualties included his father, King Birendra; his mother, Queen Aiswarya; his sister, Shruti; and his brother, Nirajan. Dipendra temporarily survived the suicide attempt and was enthroned as king as he lay in a coma. Birendra's brother, Gyanendra, became king shortly after Dipendra died. Aiswarya's disapproval of Dipendra's intended bride reportedly prompted her son's homicidal rage.
  2. 5/31/16

    Nationality.................................American Born on....................................31 May 1819 Sun Sign..................................Gemini Died on....................................26 March 1892 place of death..........................Camden, New Jersey, U.S. father.......................................Walter Whitman mother......................................Louisa Van Velsor Whitman siblings.....................................Andrew Jackson, George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Jesse, Edward, Walter Whitman was an American poet, journalist and humanist. The poet is mainly known for his approach to Transcendentalism and realism and mastery in free verses, which would mirror in his works. Among his most famous works, is his poetry collection Leaves of Grass, which was also his first significant work as a poet. The collection was first published in 1855 and since then, he kept it revising and expanding until his death. The poetry was initially labeled and banned for its obscenity though it later gained popularity and has been translated into a number of foreign languages. Whitman was also a teacher and a government clerk before taking on writing and worked as a nurse during the American Civil War. Though he opposed the slavery system in America and wrote poetries moved by their sufferings, he did not participate in the abolitionary movement at any point in his life. The poet died in 1892, at age seventy two. As early as in 1873, Whitman suffered from a paralytic stroke. His mother, whom he had been unusually close, passed away in the same year. Depressed and broken, Whitman moved to New Jersey to be with his brother George and lived there until he found a home in 1884. Meanwhile, Whitman released more editions of Leaves of Grass, publishing in 1876, 1881 and 1889. He produced a further edition of the book, which was to be its last, in 1891. During this period, he became obsessed with the frequent thoughts of death, and often wrote of his pain and suffering his notebook. He also bought a mausoleum shaped house in his last days. Walt Whitman died on 26 March 1892 of bronchial pneumonia. A grand funeral was held and his body was buried in his tomb at Harleigh Cemetry, where remain of his parents and brothers were moved with him.
  3. 5/30/16

    1790 The first U.S. Copyright Law was enacted, protecting books, maps, and other original materials. 1889 Heavy rains caused the South Fork Dam to collapse, sending 20 million tons of water into Johnstown, Pa. Over 2,200 people were killed and the town was nearly destroyed. 1911 The hull of the Titanic was launched in Belfast. At the ceremony, a White Star Line employee claimed, “Not even God himself could sink this ship.” 1961 South Africa became an independent republic. 1962 Former Gestapo official Adolf Eichmann was hanged in Israel. 1970 An earthquake in Peru left more than 50,000 dead. 2010 Nine people are dead after an Israeli navy commando attacks a flotilla of cargo ships and passenger boats on their way to Gaza to provide aid and supplies for the area. *************************************************************************************************DAILY EXTRA************************************************************** 2004...........................Alberta Martin, 97, one of the last widows of a U.S. Civil War veteran, died. She had married Confederate veteran William Martin in 1927 when she was 21 and he was 81. The last-known Union widow, Gertrude Janeway, died in Jan. 2003 in Tennessee. John Janeway joined the Union army in 1864 and was briefly a POW at Andersonville. The couple married in 1927, after waiting three years until Gertrude turned 18. John was 81. The person thought to be the last-known Confederate widow, Alberta Martin, was born Dec, 4, 1906, and died at age 97 in Alabama on May 31, 2004. In 1927, at age 21, she married William Jasper Martin, then 81. Martin joined the Confederate army in May 1864. Upon her husband's death, she married his grandson from his first marriage. The publicity surrounding Alberta Martin's death prompted relatives of Maudie Celia Hopkins of Arkansas to reveal that the 89-year-old was in fact the last civil war widow. Hopkins married 86-year-old William Cantrell on Feb. 2, 1934, when she was 19. She did so to escape poverty, but kept quiet about the unusual marriage, “I thought people would gossip about it.” Cantrell, who served in the Virginia Infantry, supported her with his Confederate pension of “$25 every two or three months” until his death in 1937. Hopkins has outlived three other husbands.
  4. 5/30/16

    Nationality...................................American Born on......................................30 May 1909 Sun Sign....................................Gemini Born in.......................................Chicago Died on......................................13 June 1986 place of death............................New York City father.........................................David Goodman mother........................................Dora Grisinsky Spouse:......................................Alice Frances Hammond children......................................Benjie, Rachel awards:.......................................Lifetime Achievement Grammy Award Benjamin David “Benny” Goodman, better known as “Benny Goodman”, was a leading jazz clarinet player and an outstanding bandleader of the Swing Era (1935-1945). He was famously nicknamed as the “King of Swing” by his band mates. He, with his hard work and the support of his band members, emerged as a national musical icon. His music was sensational and deeply fascinated his audience. Benny Goodman gave America and his audience a new kind of music. Apart from this, he was the first white bandleader who played a very important role in making jazz music famous. His shows had a new audience and a very new standard that gave jazz music a new identity altogether. His practical expertise, refined tone, persuasive solo style and irrefutable swing definitely made him achieve a permanent position in the history of jazz. Benjamin David Goodman, after a few days of his performance in his final concert at Wolf Trap, died on 13 June 1986 due to cardiopulmonary arrest in New York. He was buried in Long Ridge Cemetery in Stamford, Connecticut.
  5. 5/29/16

    1431 Joan of Arc was burned at the stake as a heretic. 1536 King Henry VIII of England married his 3rd wife, Jane Seymour, 11 days after he had his 2nd wife, Anne Boleyn executed. 1911 The first Indianapolis 500 was won by Ray Harroun. 1998 An earthquake in Northern Afghanistan (and subsequent aftershocks) killed an estimated 5,000 and injured at least 1,500. A quake on Feb. 4 in the same area had killed about 2,300. ***************************************************************************************************DAILY EXTRA************************************************************ 1922......................The Lincoln Memorial in Washington, DC, was dedicated by Chief Justice William Howard Taft. Lincoln Memorial, monument, 107 acres (45 hectares), in Potomac Park, Washington, D.C.; built 1914–17. The building, designed by Henry Bacon and styled after a Greek temple, has 36 Doric columns representing the states of the Union at the time of Lincoln's death. Inside the building is a heroic statue of Lincoln by Daniel Chester French and two murals by Jules Guerin.
  6. 5/29/16

    Nick Name...................................Juke, Jukies, Juju Nationality...................................American Born on......................................15 August 1912 AD Sun Sign.....................................Leo Born in........................................Pasadena, California Died on.......................................13 August 2004 AD place of death............................Montecito, California father..........................................John McWilliams, Jr. mother........................................Julia Carolyn siblings.......................................John III, Dorothy Dean Spouse:......................................Paul Cushing Child awards 1965 - Peabody Award for Personal Award for The French Chef 1966 - Emmy award for Achievements in Educational Television- Individuals for The French Chef 1980 - U.S. National Book Awards for Current Interest (hardcover) for Julia Child and More Company Julia Child was a cultural phenomenon who was the face of French cooking in America. She not only introduced Americans to culinary excellence but to fine dining as well. What made her novel was the fact that she made the drudgery and labour within the kitchen seem effortless and easy. Interestingly, cooking wasn’t the first love for Child who was working in the communication department of OSS before marrying Paul. A food aficionado with a sophisticated palate, he introduced her to fine cuisine. She was so bowled over by the culinary delight that she soon took to learning French cooking and the rest as they say is history. Child not only mastered the skills required for the same but resolved to introduce French culinary delights to Americans. For the same, she came out with her debut work, ‘Mastering the Art of French Cooking’ which created a stir amongst the American audience. The book was ground-breaking in terms of its content and has since been serving as the standard guide for the culinary community at large. Other than cookbooks, she also served as the host for the television show, ‘The French Chef’ and many others. Her cheery enthusiasm and distinctively charming voice coupled with an encyclopaedic know-how of French cooking made her the most viewed television cook. She breathed her last on August 13, 2004 due to kidney failure at the retirement community, Casa Dorinda in Montecito, California just two days before her 92nd birthday. United Kingdom paid tribute to the legendary cook by naming absolutely fabulous rose, which is a golden butter/gold floribunda one after her. It is today called the Julia Child Rose. Trivia This popular American chef is known for introducing French cuisine to the American community.
  7. Historic Homes

    Post 5.......Pic 2
  8. 5/28/16

    1765 Patrick Henry bitterly denounced the Stamp Act in the Virginia House of Burgesses. 1790 Rhode Island became the 13th state in the United States, the last of the original colonies to ratify the Constitution. 1848 Wisconsin became the 30th state in the United States. 1917 John F. Kennedy was born in Brookline, Mass. 1942 Bing Crosby recorded his version of “White Christmas.” It would go on to sell over 30 million copies. 1990 Boris Yeltsin was elected president of the Russian republic by the parliament. ******************************************************************************************************DAILY EXTRA********************************************************* 1953............................Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay became the first to reach the summit of Mount Everest. Called Chomolungma (“goddess mother of the world”) in Tibet and Sagarmatha (“goddess of the sky”) in Nepal, Mount Everest once went by the pedestrian name of Peak XV among Westerners. That was before surveyors established that it was the highest mountain on Earth, a fact that came as something of a surprise—Peak XV had seemed lost in the crowd of other formidable Himalayan peaks, many of which gave the illusion of greater height. In 1852 the Great Trigonometrical Survey of India measured Everest's elevation as 29,002 feet above sea level. This remarkably accurate figure remained the officially accepted height for more than one hundred years. In 1955 it was adjusted by a mere 26 feet to 29,028 (8,848 m). The mountain received its official name in 1865 in honor of Sir George Everest, the British Surveyor General from 1830–1843 who had mapped the Indian subcontinent. He had some reservations about having his name bestowed on the peak, arguing that the mountain should retain its local appellation, the standard policy of geographical societies. Pretenders to the Throne Before the Survey of India, a number of other mountains ranked supreme in the eyes of the world. In the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, the Andean peak Chimboraso was considered the highest. At a relatively unremarkable 20,561 feet (6,267 m), it is in fact nowhere near the highest, surpassed by about thirty other Andean peaks and several dozen in the Himalayas. In 1809, the Himalayan peak Dhaulagiri (26,810 ft.; 8,172 m) was declared the ultimate, only to be shunted aside in 1840 by Kanchenjunga (28,208 ft.; 8,598 m), which today ranks third. Everest's status has been unrivaled for the last century-and-a-half, but not without a few threats. The most recent challenge came from a 1986 American expedition climbing K2 (28,250 ft., 8,611 m) in the Karakoram range. According to their measurements, K2 was actually 29,284 feet, beating Everest by a cool 256 feet. Had this figure been accepted, mountaineering history would have required drastic revision: Everest would have taken a back seat to K2, no longer the ne plus ultra of geographical extremes. The Third Pole Once the North and South Poles had been reached by explorers, the next geographical feat to capture the international imagination was Everest, often called the Third Pole. Attempts to climb Everest began in the 1921, when the forbidden kingdom of Tibet opened its borders to outsiders. On June 8, 1924, two members of a British expedition, George Mallory and Andrew Irvine, attempted the summit. Famous for his retort to the press—“because it's there”—when asked why he wanted to climb Everest, Mallory had already failed twice at reaching the summit. The two men were last spotted “going strong” for the top until the clouds perpetually swirling around Everest engulfed them. They vanished for good. Mallory's body was not found for another 75 years, and it did not clear up the mystery as to whether the two men made it to the top before the mountain killed them. Ten more expeditions over a period of thirty years failed to conquer Everest, with 13 losing their lives. Then, on May 29, 1953, Edmund Hillary, a New Zealand beekeeper, and Tenzing Norgay, an acclaimed Sherpa climber, became the first to reach the roof of the world. Their climb was made from the Nepalese side, which had eased its restrictions on foreigners at about the same time that Tibet, invaded in 1950 by China, shut its borders. World famous overnight, Hillary became a hero of the British empire—the news reached London just in time for Elizabeth II's coronation—and Norgay was touted as a symbol of national pride by three separate nations: Nepal, Tibet, and India. Into the Death Zone Although not considered one of the most technically challenging mountains to climb (K2 is more difficult), the dangers of Everest include avalanches, crevasses, ferocious winds up to 125 mph, sudden storms, temperatures of 40°F below zero, and oxygen deprivation. In the “death zone”—above 25,000 feet—the air holds only a third as much oxygen as at sea level, heightening the chances of hypothermia, frostbite, high-altitude pulmonary edema (when the lungs fatally fill with fluid) and high-altitude cerebral edema (when the oxygen-starved brain swells up). Even when breathing bottled oxygen, climbers experience extreme fatigue, impaired judgment and coordination, headaches, nausea, double vision, and sometimes hallucinations. Expeditions spend weeks, sometimes months, acclimatizing, and usually attempt Everest only in May and October, avoiding the winter snows and the summer monsoons. After Hillary and Norgay's ascent of Everest, other records were broken, including the first ascent by a woman, the first solo ascent, the first to traverse up one route and down another, and the first descent on skis. Yet none of these records compared to the next true milestone: climbing Everest without supplemental oxygen. As far back as Mallory, who called the use of bottled oxygen “unsporting,” climbers found they had no alternative. Yet on May 8, 1978, two Tyrolean mountaineers, Reinhold Messner and Peter Habeler, achieved the impossible. Messner had resolved that nothing would come between him and the mountain; he would climb Everest without supplemental oxygen or not at all. At the summit he described himself as “nothing more than a single narrow gasping lung.” Incredulous, some disputed the veracity of an oxygenless climb. Yet two years later Messner quelled all skepticism when on August 20, 1980, he again ascended Everest without oxygen, this time solo. Climbing without oxygen has now become de rigueur among the climbing elite, and by 1996 more than 60 men and women had reached the top relying on their own gasping lungs. An Icy Graveyard Between 1922 and 2010, Everest has been climbed by more than 5,000 people from 85 countries. More than 200 have lost their lives, the odds being one-in-six of not making it down alive. The dead are left where they perish because the effects of the altitude make it nearly impossible to drag bodies off the mountain. Those ascending Everest pass through an icy graveyard littered with remnants of old tents and equipment, empty oxygen canisters, and frozen corpses. In the past few years, media access to Everest has mushroomed: live Internet reports have been sent from the mountain (using solar energy); an Imax film crew has documented a climb, returning two years in a row before attaining the summit; and Jon Krakauer's bestselling account about an Everest ascent gone wrong, Into Thin Air, has introduced cwm, col, sirdar, short-rope, and Hillary Step into the vocabulary of mainstream America. There are now guided trips up the mountain, fanning debate about the commercialization of Everest. Purists like Hillary lament the lack of respect for the mountain and Young Turks boast they can get nearly anyone up the mountain as long as they're in decent physical shape and have $65,000 to spare. One reason for the recent media attention is the novelty of comparatively ordinary people venturing up a Mount Parnassus formerly limited to gods like Messner and Hillary. Pathologists and postal workers now follow in their footsteps. Another reason is the appalling waste of human life. In May 1996, eight lost their lives in the single greatest disaster on the mountain—yet it did not stop others from attempting the climb just weeks later, resulting in four more deaths. The total for the year was fifteen. The following May, another nine mountaineers died. As the number of climbers grow, so does the death toll, with Everest taking down world-class climbers and novice adventurers alike.
  9. 5/28/16

    Also Known As ......................................James Francis Thorpe Nationality..............................................American religion..................................................Roman Catholic Born on.................................................28 May 1888 AD Sun Sign...............................................Gemini Gemini Men Born in..................................................Pottawatomie County, Oklahoma Died on.................................................28 March 1953 AD place of death.......................................Lomita father....................................................Hiram P. Thorpe mother..................................................Charlotte Vieux siblings.................................................Charlie Spouses...............................................Iva Margaret Miller, , Freeda V. Kirkpatrick, Patricia Askew children...............................................Jim Jr., Gale, Charlotte, Grace, Carl, William, Richard, John education Carlisle Indian School Pennsylvania (1903-12) Haskell Indian Nations University awards: 1911 - All American Honors 1912 - All American Honors 1912 - Gold Medal in Pentathlon at Olympics 1912 - Gold Medal in Decathlon at Olympics Often regarded as the greatest athlete of the 20th century, James Francis “Jim” Thorpe was a versatile athlete who excelled in a wide number of sports. He was an Olympic gold medalist in pentathlon and decathlon. In addition, he had played football during his college days and also played baseball and basketball at the professional level. He started playing football while at school and eventually branched out into other sports as well. One of his earliest coaches was the football legend, Glenn “Pop” Warner who helped to mould the youngster into a formidable competitor. After his Olympic win, the King of Sweden congratulated him, calling him the greatest of all athletes in the world. However, his Olympic titles were taken away after it was revealed that he had played professional baseball before competing in the Olympics. This violated the amateurism rules of the Olympic. However, his Olympic achievements were restored to his credit 30 years after his death. The strong and healthy athlete participated in competitive sports until the age of 41. But life was not always kind to him. He struggled to make ends meet during his final years and became a victim to alcoholism which ruined his health and well being. Trivia This Olympic Gold Medalist, often called the greatest athlete of the 20th century, had also acted in films as an extra.
  10. Caption Contest # 142

    Oh No you don't, I was saving those for a snack later.
  11. 5/27/16

    1863 Robert Gould Shaw, leading the first northern all-black regiment, leaves Boston for the Civil War. 1929 The first all-color, full-length talking picture, On With the Show!, debuted. 1934 The Dionne quintuplets were born in Ontario, Canada. 1957 Baseball owners voted to allow the Brooklyn Dodgers and New York Giants to move to Los Angeles and San Francisco, respectively. Many New Yorkers still haven’t recovered. See other baseball city and nickname changes. 1987 Mathias Rust, a 19-year-old pilot from West Germany, landed his private plane in Moscow’s Red Square. He was arrested and sentenced to four years in a labor camp, but was released after just one. 1997 Linda Finch completed Amelia Earhart's attempted around-the-world flight. 1998 Pakistan staged nuclear tests in response to India's nuclear tests two weeks earlier. **********************************************************************************************************DAILY EXTRA***************************************************** 2003................................Pres. Bush signed a $350 billion tax cut into law; the third largest tax cut in U.S. history. On the domestic front, President Bush unveiled a sweeping economic stimulus plan that characteristically centered around tax cuts. The plan in its original form was to cut taxes by $670 billion over ten years; Congress approved a $350 billion version in May (which will in fact rise to a $800 billion tax cut if its sunset clauses are cancelled). The plan strongly favored two groups: two-parent households with several children, and the wealthy—nearly half the proposed tax benefits were reserved for the richest 10% of American taxpayers. Critics argued that it was unsound to offer tax cuts in the midst of a jobless recovery (nearly 3 million jobs had been lost since Bush came to office), when the country was involved in an enormously expensive war, and when the federal budget deficit, according to the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office, was expected to reach a record $480 billion in 2004. Bush continued to argue that his previous tax cuts (this was his third round) had managed to keep the recession shallow and were beginning to revive the economy. And indeed, the economy began to rebound substantially in the latter part of 2003. GDP grew by a vigorous 7.2% in the third quarter, and in the fourth quarter, unemployment began to drop as productivity increased. But prospects remained bleak for the poor: the most recent statistics revealed that in 2002, 34.6 million (12% of the population) lived in poverty, up 1.7 million from the year 2001, and the percent of the population without health insurance rose to 15.2%, the largest increase in a decade.
  12. 5/27/16

    Nationality.....................................American Born on........................................16 September 1981 AD Sun Sign......................................Virgo Born in.........................................Houston, Texas, USA father...........................................Martin Bledel mother.........................................Nanette (nee Dozier) Bledel siblings........................................Eric David Bledel education St. Agnes Academy NYU's Tisch School of the Arts Net worth $8 million Alexis Bledel is a famous American model, actress and producer, who shot to fame with the hit television series, ‘Gilmore Girls’. Her ability to baby-talk and her charismatic personality won the hearts of millions around the world and earned her a number of roles in coming-of-age series’ and movies. Apart from appearing in ‘Gilmore Girls’, she was also seen in ‘The Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants’, ‘The Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants 2’, ‘Sin City’ and ‘Tuck Everlasting’. Before she became an actress, she was a budding model and posed for years in front of the camera and has appeared on the covers of a number of mainstream magazines including ‘Teen People’, ‘TV Guide’, ‘Latina’, ‘Entertainment Weekly’, ‘WWD’ and ‘Elle Girl’. She started her modeling career when she was in high school and has since then, traveled to a number of locations around the world including Tokyo, Milan, New York and Los Angeles. Sometime during the peak of her career, she admitted that she did not want to make a full-time commitment with roles on television because she felt that being in front of the camera was a ‘tedious’ and an ‘all-consuming’ job. She instead wanted to focus her energies on films and modeling. Trivia This famous American actress and model hates coffee in real life, but in ‘reel’ life, her character, ‘Rory Gilmore’ consumed coffee on a daily basis.
  13. Happy Birthday GB2064

    Happy Birthday GB2064