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TooOld

No desktop on Toshiba Satellite

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I have a Toshiba Satellite M115-S1061 that was giving to me. When I turn it on it goes to the Microsoft Windows XP loading screen, and then the welcome screen, then to a blank desktop. It does have what I believe is a factory background that says Satellite, but no start menu, no desktop icons, nothing. I dont know what I have to do to fix it, or if it can even be fixed. If it helps any, I am able to open the task manager using ctrl+alt+delete. There are no applications running, and 29 different processes going on.

Anyone have an idea whats going on, and if/how I can fix it.
Thanks

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I'm just a Linux user so this may help or not

http://www.bleepingcomputer.com/tutorials/windows-xp-recovery-features/

Be patient and wait for the other windows users to respond to your problem. Good Luck with it.

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MichaelJ - I got seasick watching that video.

 

i would suggest that TooOld forget about trying to install XP on that machine and instead install a current version of Ubuntu.  XP isn't safe and secure, it will only lead to problems.  Ubuntu will run nicely on that machine and is an easy transition from using XP.

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rokytnji,
I actually wouldn't mind wiping windows xp off of the hard drive and installing linux. I have heard a lot of good things about linux.


MichaelJ,
first time I held 0 and hit the power button, the initial loading page came up, the one that it has the boot option...continued holding, computer never beeped, and it turned off on its own. Second time doing it, it went to the screen where it says that windows did not start successfully and gives you the option to start in safe mode, safe mode with networking, safe mode with command prompt, or start windows normally. Also, it froze on that screen.

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MichaelJ - I got seasick watching that video.

 

i would suggest that TooOld forget about trying to install XP on that machine and instead install a current version of Ubuntu.  XP isn't safe and secure, it will only lead to problems.  Ubuntu will run nicely on that machine and is an easy transition from using XP.

I was thinking about doing this, just thought maybe it was easier to fix the xp

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Well. If interested in Linux and following NK suggestion on Ubuntu

For grins. What mine looks like that I am posting from now.

But I am skilled at doing custom paint jobs on my operating systems.

Back on topic. I would suggest https://www.linuxliteos.com/forums/release-announcements/linux-lite-2-6-final-released/
for a case like this where NKTower and ease of use for you are filled by my suggestion.
Just released a week ago and mine looks like this

Easy to install. Made for migrating XP users. Based on Ubuntu 14.04  LTS. Friendly bunch of forum members like me that answer questions. You could do worse picking something on your own. Md5sum check a linux iso before burning it.

The Other Operating system section in this forum has my stickies on how to md5sum in Windows among other things.

Up to you though. I have been a Linux user for years and have not looked back. Broni knows this about me.

Install How To

Edited by rokytnji

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Thanks Roky.

Looks interesting.

TooOld - I too, run Linux about 99% of the time. 

 

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Let's see if we can take a look at what's going on from an external source...

Using another working computer....

  • Download Farbar Recovery Scan Tool and save it to a flash drive.
  • Download OTLPENet.exe to your Desktop
  • Ensure that you have a blank CD in the drive
  • Double click OTLPENet.exe and this will then open ImgBurn to burn the file to CD
  • Boot your BAD computer using the boot CD you just created.

Note : If you do not know how to set your computer to boot from CD follow the steps here

  • Your system should now display a Reatogo desktop.
  • Insert the flash drive with FRST on it
  • Open My Computer to locate the flash drive and run FRST
  • The tool will start to run.
  • When the tool opens click Yes to disclaimer.
  • Press Scan button.
  • It will make a log (FRST.txt) on the flash drive. Please copy and paste it to your reply.

 

 

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Well. If interested in Linux and following NK suggestion on Ubuntu

For grins. What mine looks like that I am posting from now.

But I am skilled at doing custom paint jobs on my operating systems.

Back on topic. I would suggest https://www.linuxliteos.com/forums/release-announcements/linux-lite-2-6-final-released/
for a case like this where NKTower and ease of use for you are filled by my suggestion.
Just released a week ago and mine looks like this

Easy to install. Made for migrating XP users. Based on Ubuntu 14.04  LTS. Friendly bunch of forum members like me that answer questions. You could do worse picking something on your own. Md5sum check a linux iso before burning it.

The Other Operating system section in this forum has my stickies on how to md5sum in Windows among other things.

Up to you though. I have been a Linux user for years and have not looked back. Broni knows this about me.

rockytnji, I would like to do it, but if you dont mind, I may need you to hold my hand and walk me through it.

Download linux lite 2.6, Md5sum check it, burn it to a disk, and then load it onto the laptop? Can I use a USB memory stick, or does it have to be on a disk? Im currently searching for this Md5sum you are speaking of.

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Thanks Roky.

Looks interesting.

TooOld - I too, run Linux about 99% of the time. 

 

I have thought about it for awhile now. My son has been telling my wife and I for a while about using Linux for its speed but more so its security. The security is what I like, my wife is a sucker for downloading things because "the computer told her to".

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Let's see if we can take a look at what's going on from an external source...

Using another working computer....

  • Download Farbar Recovery Scan Tool and save it to a flash drive.
  • Download OTLPENet.exe to your Desktop
  • Ensure that you have a blank CD in the drive
  • Double click OTLPENet.exe and this will then open ImgBurn to burn the file to CD
  • Boot your BAD computer using the boot CD you just created.

Note : If you do not know how to set your computer to boot from CD follow the steps here

  • Your system should now display a Reatogo desktop.
  • Insert the flash drive with FRST on it
  • Open My Computer to locate the flash drive and run FRST
  • The tool will start to run.
  • When the tool opens click Yes to disclaimer.
  • Press Scan button.
  • It will make a log (FRST.txt) on the flash drive. Please copy and paste it to your reply.

 

 

Broni, I am sorry to have waisted some of your time. I have decided to install Linux on that laptop, and get rid of the xp. Again, I apologize

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Read my post again. I added a install how to video from youtube. It walks you through md5sum and everything.

 

Edit: I did not mean to step on any toes in this thread. Bronis route is a good route also to travel to fix this issue if wishing to keep windows XP.

Edited by rokytnji

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Read my post again. I added a install how to video from youtube. It walks you through md5sum and everything.

my apologies...my eyes just aren't what they used to be

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Made the USB bootable stick, and have used it to boot 3 different computers/laptops.

12027670_10204942030813760_8541674918950

I happen to like it.


linux@linux:~$ inxi -Fxz

System: Host: linux Kernel: 3.13.0-62-generic x86_64 (64 bit, gcc: 4.8.2)

Desktop: Xfce 4.11.8 (Gtk 2.24.23) Distro: Ubuntu 14.04 trusty

Machine: Mobo: MSI model: 990XA-GD55 (MS-7640) version: 4.0 Bios: American Megatrends version: V22.4 date: 04/26/2012

CPU: Octa core AMD FX-8150 Eight-Core (-MCP-) cache: 16384 KB flags: (lm nx sse sse2 sse3 sse4_1 sse4_2 sse4a ssse3 svm) bmips: 57599.1

Clock Speeds: 1: 1400.00 MHz 2: 1400.00 MHz 3: 1400.00 MHz 4: 1400.00 MHz 5: 1400.00 MHz 6: 2100.00 MHz 7: 1400.00 MHz 8: 1400.00 MHz

Graphics: Card: Advanced Micro Devices [AMD/ATI] Cedar [Radeon HD 5000/6000/7350/8350 Series] bus-ID: 01:00.0

X.Org: 1.15.1 drivers: ati,radeon (unloaded: fbdev,vesa) Resolution: 1920x1080@60.0hz

GLX Renderer: Gallium 0.4 on AMD CEDAR GLX Version: 3.0 Mesa 10.1.3 Direct Rendering: Yes

Audio: Card-1: Advanced Micro Devices [AMD/ATI] SBx00 Azalia (Intel HDA) driver: snd_hda_intel bus-ID: 00:14.2

Card-2: Advanced Micro Devices [AMD/ATI] Cedar HDMI Audio [Radeon HD 5400/6300 Series]

driver: snd_hda_intel bus-ID: 01:00.1

Sound: Advanced Linux Sound Architecture ver: k3.13.0-62-generic

Network: Card: Realtek RTL8111/8168/8411 PCI Express Gigabit Ethernet Controller

driver: r8169 ver: 2.3LK-NAPI port: d000 bus-ID: 02:00.0

IF: p5p1 state: up speed: 1000 Mbps duplex: full mac: <filter>

Drives: HDD Total Size: 3024.6GB (0.4% used) 1: id: /dev/sda model: WDC_WD10EZEX size: 1000.2GB temp: 35C

2: id: /dev/sdb model: WDC_WD2002FAEX size: 2000.4GB temp: 41C 3: USB id: /dev/sdc model: JumpDrive size: 8.0GB temp: 0C

4: USB id: /dev/sdd model: Patriot_Memory size: 16.0GB temp: 0C

Partition: ID: / size: 2.0G used: 369M (20%) fs: overlayfs

RAID: No RAID devices detected - /proc/mdstat and md_mod kernel raid module present

Sensors: System Temperatures: cpu: 20.5C mobo: N/A gpu: 50.5

Fan Speeds (in rpm): cpu: N/A

Info: Processes: 223 Uptime: 11 min Memory: 535.1/7955.7MB Runlevel: 2 Gcc sys: 4.8.4

Client: Shell (bash 4.3.11) inxi: 1.9.17  

 

Desktop

12022584_10204942091855286_1956681679892

 

 

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TooOld - Broni can and will walk you through how to identify the problem with the XP not bringing up a desktop if you want to get the thing running XP.  I have a theory as to what may be wrong:   I think that in the first post you mentioned that you had been given the machine.  If so, it is quite possible that the previous owner deleted all of the user profiles and folders and as a result as part of the boot the thing just doesn't know where to go, i.e. which desktop to load etc.   Even if that's the case, I just can not recommend anyone continuing with XP, it is just too full of security holes that can be exploited.  So that's why I suggested going to Ubuntu.

Last spring when Microsoft pulled the plug on XP's support our local user group hosted a "Convert from XP to Ubuntu" workshop.  I led the workshop and had 3 other volunteers.  We had 14 pepple bring notebook machines, plus 4 or 5 who had desktops at home and just came to observe.  Of the 14 notebooks, 13 installed Ubuntu, mostly did complete 'wipe the drive' installs, a few did the 'dual boot' install where they could still get into XP if they wanted to do so.  The one machine that was a problemwas an early IBM ThinkPad T-40.  We got him running the next day using Xubuntu, which has a smaller desktop GUI.

As far as I know, none of the participants have regretted converting from XP to Ubuntu.

Here are some notes from our experiences in installing Ubuntu.  The notes are not listed in the order that I thought of them, not in the sequence that you might encounter the individual topics.

Ubuntu release numbering scheme:  14.04.x   LTS    14.04 - April, 2014.  The .x is the patch release number.  LTS stands for Long Term Support.  The LTS releases come out in April of the even-numbered years.  They are supported for (I think) 5 years).  The odd numbered year releases or those with non-April months are for those who want to expiment.   The releases are distributed as binarys for 32 and 64 bit machines.  The 32 bit releases have i386 in the name but that doesn't mean that they are only for old 386, 486, Pentium etc., machine, it is just to differentiate between the 64-bit machines, which have AMD64 in the name.  And that doesn't mean just AMD processors, they work fine on intel processors as well.   If you don't have more than 3.2GB or RAM in your machine there is absolutely no benefit to going to the 64-bit version.
As of today (Sept. 13m 2015) the download for desktop is here: http://www.ubuntu.com/download/desktop

The ISO files are more than 740MB, so they won't fit on a CD.  While they are called "Live CD"s they have to go on a DVD (which can tyically handle 4.7GB.   The freeware ImageBurn utility can create a bootable DVD from the ISO file.  I have created a bootable USB for installing Windows 10 using a Microsoft-supplied utility, and a bootable microSDHC card for installing Rasbian on a Raspberry Pi, but not (yet) created a bootable USB flash drive for installing Ubuntu.  I'm sure that Roky can point you to a utliity to create a bootable flash drive from a Ubuntu ISO download.

Note: Just saw Shay's posting which mentions a utility for creating the bootable flash drive, so use that.

MDsum is a mechanism whereby each byte of a file (.ISO in our case) is fed into a calculation such that it is highly unlikely that two errors will offset each other.  If the published sum and the calculated sum match then it is very very probable that the file has not been corrupted or tampered with.

If you have a DVD reader in the XP machine you are all set.  Otherwise you are going to need a bootable flash drive or other external USB device.  You may need to get into the machines SETUP to change the boot sequence.  On some machines this is dont by tapping the DEL key or one of the F-keys (F11, F12, etc.) whild the manufacturer's 'splash' screen is visible.  There is usually text somewhere on the screen that tells you which key to press for SETUP.

When you boot from the DVD (or the flash drive) it will take about a minute before you see muchh.  First thing you probably will see will be "Ubunto" with some dots below, they change from white to red to white progressively.  Ultimately you wlll get to large icons.  The left one is to "try before you buy" so to speak - you can run Ubunto directly from the Live CD.  It will be slower than from a hard disk nstallation but you can get the "look and feel".  The other option is to install on the hard disk.

If you go to install on the hard disk it will sense that you have a Windows installation.  (But it won't sense that it is damaged.)  The default is to do a 'parallel' install that makes use of GRUB to select at boot time whether you want to boot Windows or Linux with Linux as the default.  (GRUB doesn't care which distribution of Linux you have, they are all the same to it.   The second option is to blow away the Windows install and just install Ubuntu.  The 3rd option if presented is "something else" - such as add a 3rd operating system - perhaps 15.something etc.

The Ubuntu installer is very good at detecting the WiFi adapter if you have one.  If you don't I recommend that you connect a Cat-5 cable to your router so that the internet is available during installation.

Assuming that you go for the full install, it will ghen go through about 5 screens where it asks you some basic questions.  One of the will be to ask if you want to get updates as part of the install.  When we did this in the user group workshop we said "no" as our internet connection (wired or WiFi) didn't have the capacity to handle 14 simultaneous machines.  It is your call as to whether you get the updates during install.

However there is also a checkbox for "3rd party" downloads.  These are few and you want them.  They are separate for historical reasons.  For example, MP3 format files use a proprietary format and the code is licensed.  it is NOT published under the GPL license.  To do so the owner would have to publish his source code.  So instead he provides a free license to use the binary that gets downloaded, thus not exposing his code.  So if you want support for MP3 and similar you want to check that box.

You will be asked for a password for the primary logon account.  That account will have 'super user' permissions.  Any time you want to do something that affects your machine's configuration, such as insall software, change important settings, add/change/delete users etc., you will be asked to 'Authenticate' - provide that password.  When first asked for the password thee is a check box where you can say "don't require password when the machine boots."  You can also get at this via the equivalent of the control panel (once you 'Authenticate'!)

It iwll install LibreOffice - very much like Microsoft Office 2003 in 'look and feel'.  Within that you may change it so that it defaults to opending or saving MS Office format files by default rather than the OpenOffice file formats.  LibreOffice is file compatible with MS Office EXCEPT that it doesn't work with MS Access files.

Firefox will install by default.  You can install Google Chrome if you like.

Ubuntu is based upon the Debian distribution, so it uses .DEB packages for installing stuff.

User-visible differences:
The equivalent to the Windows task bar (across the bottom in Windows) is icons on the left edge of the screen.  Sinstead of a "Start" button at bottom left corner there is an icon (a circle with some dots sort of) at top left corner that launches 'the launcher'.  You may type in the name of something, such as "GEDIT" or "TERMINAL" or "VirtualBox" etc. and it will find it and launch it.  It also shows what you have done recently as icons below where you could have typed, etc.

At top right is a 'gear' - this pulls down a drop-down that has various things, including "Log off", "Switch User", and the ever-popular "Shutdown".

There is an icon with an up-arrow and a down-arrow.  This is your internet connection control and if you have Wi-Fi you will find the way to select Wi-Fi network from available list, connect, provide PSK (Pre-Shared-Key) etc.
The speaker icon gives you volume control as well as way to launch audo player.
VLC is an excellent multi-media player - I've never run into a format it can't handle.  

Windows has the "minimize", "Full Screen/Resize Screen" and "Close" boxes at the top right corner of each window frame.  Ubuntu uses circles at upper left - red with X, yellow with line, green with box to do these.  For a multiple-document nterface (such as, say folder views etc.) these may not appear until you move the mouse pointer to where you expect them to be.  Same for getting the tupical FILE / EDIT / VIEW .... HELP text menus.  It's different but doesn't take long to get the hand of it.

There will  be cases where you will need to use a terminal screen to do things.  For example, you might need to do something liike this:

    sudo   apt-get    packagename   install

sudo (super user do) is used to say "Yes, I want to do this as the super user (the root user, the owner of the machine.)
apt-get - go and get this package from the 'repository' - a site o the web known to Ubuntu.
packagename - what you want
install - what you want to do with the package.

However for the thousands of pre-packaged things known to Ubuntu you can just search for the package in the software app and click on it and it will do it for you.  This is very similar to using the Apple Store or Google Play.  Most of the things there are free, some are for fee.  You will be amazed at the variety of free things.

--------------------

I am a retired consultant.  All of my former clients ran Windows environments.  I did mostly database development and as such had to replicate my client's environments.  Some of them had, say, MS SQL Server 2000, or SQL Server 2003, or SQL Server 2008 etc.  Releases of SQL Server are not necessarily backwards compatible, thus if I did something in 2008 I couldn't put it on a client's 2003 platform.  I used Ubuntu as my host server machine and ran Oracle's VIrtualBox on it.  Within VirtualBox I had virtual Windows machines - DOS 6, 95, 98SE, NT Pro Workstation 2000, XP, Vista, Windows 7, Server 2000, Server 2003, Server 2008 R2) so that I could replicate the client's environment and work on it locally. Yes, even DOS 6 - I had to convert some 30-year old WordStar documents from a university's archives.

I am NOT a Ubuntu or LInux expert, I know enough to 'get by'.  But it has been a relatively easy learning curve and I've found what I need on the web or by asking Roky.  I still run Windows 7 desktop but not exactly by choice - I'm legally blind and need assistive software that currently only works on Windows 7.  There is nothing similar for the Linux environment.  BUT I can remote control the Linux host downstairs from here and/or get into the VMs from here using the assistive software on Windows 7.  That let me keep active for many years in spite of my vision situation.

Good luck to you, I think you will find transition to Linux (especially Ubuntu) to be relatively painless - and it won't impact your wallet at all!

   
 

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