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Broni

Don't Reactivate After Reinstalling

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Broni   

If you reinstall Windows XP, you normally have to reactivate it, but there's a way around reactivation. Windows XP maintains the activation information in the file Wpa.dbl, which you'll find in the Windows\System32 folder. After you activate, and any time you add hardware to your system, back up the file to another disk. If you need to reinstall Windows XP for any reason, go through the installation routine, then copy the latest version of Wpa.dbl to the Windows\system32 folder.

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ojas25   

:dancin_banana:

If you reinstall Windows XP, you normally have to reactivate it, but there's a way around reactivation. Windows XP maintains the activation information in the file Wpa.dbl, which you'll find in the Windows\System32 folder. After you activate, and any time you add hardware to your system, back up the file to another disk. If you need to reinstall Windows XP for any reason, go through the installation routine, then copy the latest version of Wpa.dbl to the Windows\system32 folder.

:dancin_banana: Thanks for this tip I will it a try Ojas

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If you reinstall Windows XP, you normally have to reactivate it, but there's a way around reactivation. Windows XP maintains the activation information in the file Wpa.dbl, which you'll find in the Windows\System32 folder. After you activate, and any time you add hardware to your system, back up the file to another disk. If you need to reinstall Windows XP for any reason, go through the installation routine, then copy the latest version of Wpa.dbl to the Windows\system32 folder.

nice one Broni, very educational I would say! :hi:

spider

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If you reinstall Windows XP, you normally have to reactivate it, but there's a way around reactivation. Windows XP maintains the activation information in the file Wpa.dbl, which you'll find in the Windows\System32 folder.

I've done this successfully(way to many times). Only I reinsert both WPA.BAK and WPA.DBL Is this overkill? :30428:

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So wpa.dbl is the important one, thanks good to know! :pianosmiley:

I read once that windows made these files by radomly grabbing parts of harware seriel# and machine ids, that true?

can one edit them when hardware is swapped out or new apps are loaded( which can I read cause a new # )

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Broni   

I read once that windows made these files by radomly grabbing parts of harware seriel# and machine ids, that true?

can one edit them when hardware is swapped out or new apps are loaded( which can I read cause a new # )

I have no idea....

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Guest Berton   
Guest Berton

There's no hard and fast list of changes that can be made but usually changing the motherboard and/or CPU will kick out that it is a different computer and cause the need for Activation. With most of the 'brands' you have to stay with the same/replacement board as the factory restore discs may not work on others, coded to prevent use otherwise. I've changed HDDs, Opticals, Sound and Network cards without problems.

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